How was your life in 2019

The social situation in Germany

In 2019, only 36.2 percent of the population lived as a parent or child in a family with at least one minor child - half as parents, the other half as children. In eastern Germany in particular, fewer and fewer people live in families with children under 18: The proportion of the population in the eastern German states fell from 46.0 to 33.6 percent between 1996 and 2019 - in western Germany (excluding Berlin) the proportion decreased in these years from 42.2 to 36.7 percent.

Facts

In 2019, only 36.2 percent of the population lived as a parent or child in a family with at least one minor child. In 1996 this share was still 42.8 percent across Germany. Of the 29.7 million people living in a family with at least one child under the age of 18 in 2019, 13.3 million were parents in a couple and 1.5 million were single parents. 14.8 million - and thus half of the family members considered here - were children. At 91.1 percent, children under the age of 18 predominated, and only 8.9 percent were of legal age.

At the state level, the respective proportion of the population living in a family with at least one minor child was lowest in Saxony-Anhalt in 2019 (31.9 percent). In Saarland, Thuringia, Mecklenburg-Western Pomerania and Bremen, the proportion was around a third. On the other side were Baden-Württemberg (37.5 percent), Hesse (37.3 percent), North Rhine-Westphalia and Bavaria (36.8 percent) and Hamburg (36.7 percent). In 1996, the proportions of the population living in a family were still higher in all eastern German territorial states than in the western German federal states - the values ​​were between 44.0 percent in Saxony and 49.3 percent in Mecklenburg-Western Pomerania. In 1996, a total of 46.0 percent of the population in the eastern German states lived as a parent or child in a family; in 2019 it was only around a third (33.6 percent).

In western Germany (excluding Berlin), the proportion of the population living in a family with at least one minor child decreased between 1996 and 2019 from 42.2 to 36.7 percent - compared to eastern Germany, the decline was only half as high (5.4 versus 10.8 percentage points). The decline was greatest in western Germany in Bavaria, where in 1996 43.6 percent of the population still lived with one family, but only 36.8 percent in 2019 (minus 6.8 percentage points). When comparing the years 1996/2019, Hamburg was the only federal state in which the corresponding proportion increased - from 34.9 to 36.7 percent (plus 1.8 percentage points).

In addition to the decline in the proportion of the population living in families, the absolute number of families in Germany has also decreased. Between April 1996 and 2019 it fell from 9.4 to 8.2 million (minus 13.2 percent). However, there were about the same number of families in 2019 as in 2009 - the value fluctuated significantly in this decade. The decline was particularly strong in eastern Germany: the number of families fell between 1996 and 2019 from 2.2 to 1.6 million or by 29.2 percent (western Germany: minus 8.2 percent). In 2019, of all families in Germany, only just under one in five lived in eastern Germany (19.2 percent); in 1996 it was just under one in four (23.6 percent).

The number of families of married couples fell by 25.4 percent between 1996 and 2019 - from 7.7 to 5.7 million (2015: 5.5 million). The number of families of unmarried couples, on the other hand, more than doubled from 452,000 to 942,000 (plus 108.4 percent). The number of single parents rose from 1.3 million in 1996 to a good 1.5 million in 2019 (plus 16.9 percent). In 2015, however, there were still 1.6 million single parent families - 120,000 more than in 2019.

Data Source

Federal Statistical Office: Microcensus 2019

Terms, methodological notes or reading aids

children are single persons without a life partner and without children of their own in the household who live with at least one parent in a family. In addition to biological children, stepchildren, adoptive children and foster children are also considered children in the microcensus, provided that the aforementioned requirements are met. In principle, there is no age limit for counting as a child in the microcensus, however, only parent-child communities with at least one minor and possibly other minor or adult children in the household are considered families.

Children who still live with their parents in the same household but who are already looking after their own children there, are no longer single or live with a partner are not included in the family of origin, but instead count statistically as a separate family or family Life form.

The basis for the representation here is the population in families / lifestyles at the main residence. It is derived from the population in private households and is numerically smaller than this. In the case of the population in private households, no distinction is made between main and secondary residence. Since one person can be entitled to live in several private households, multiple counts are possible.

The Microcensus is the largest annual household survey of official statistics in Germany. With around 810,000 people in around 370,000 private households and communal accommodation, around 1 percent of the population in Germany is surveyed about their working and living conditions.

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