Why do people like their parents

Who babies like - and why

Hearing also influences whether the little one smiles or cries. Some babies love it when someone makes jokes with them loudly. Others immediately feel uncomfortable when someone has just a loud voice. "It's all a question of genes and habits," says the developmental psychologist. "Depending on its temperament, one baby can tolerate more and another less."

As soon as the little ones can see better, the optics also decide whether they give someone a smile or the corners of their mouths go down. Because - as studies have shown - babies prefer to look at faces that are symmetrical. Incidentally, they also find adults much nicer and consider such people to be attractive. And studies show something else: If mom is mainly there for the baby, the little one prefers female faces. It works the other way around with dad but the same way.

Whether a caregiver or a stranger: patience creates trust

From the second half year of life, babies choose more and more finely. Now they can differentiate between not-so-important people and very close caregivers - and they are clearly preferred. Everyone else has to work for Baby's trust first. A question of patience, the expert confirms: "The more sensitive the adults are to the baby, the higher the probability that they will win his affection."

In other words: The grandma, who takes care of the little one with every visit, is suddenly the very best, although she was not allowed to get too close to the baby on the first visit. It can happen that even mom is now logged off. "That is completely normal," says the psychologist. "The baby now seems to have a lot of catching up to do with grandma. That is why she is preferred to mother for a while."

In the long term, babies adopt their parents' behavior

From around ten months, babies begin to adapt their behavior to familiar people. "If, for example, a mother behaves cautiously and cautiously towards strangers, the offspring will also observe strangers critically from a safe distance," says Höhl.

That happily happens when there are seldom visitors. Mom and Dad are happy to see old friends again after a long time. And the offspring? Take cover. The advice of the psychologist: "Respect the child's restraint. Especially when parents realize that they react similarly to strangers." The child will thaw out. At the latest when it finds out: I can smell them quite well.